Synposium

Jason Y. Sproul

April 8, 2017
by jsproul
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Trump’s Trifecta of Totalitarianism

Donald campaigned against getting involved in foreign wars. Guess what? He lied. He won’t do it for (misguided) humanitarian reasons like Hillary, who he attacked in the campaign for being an interventionist hawk, but he will gladly do it to make himself look like a real leader and to get his Russian ties and subsequent coverups off the front pages.

This is a gift to the Putin and Assad regimes in Russia and Syria, and a distraction for the media and the public in the US. Win-win-win. It’s a trifecta of totalitarianism.

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Colorado Sunset

April 3, 2017 by jsproul | 0 comments

Colorado Sunset © 2017 Jason Y. Sproul

Taken from a flight into DEN on March 5, 2017. Slightly rotated and cropped to level horizon, color saturation +10% to compensate for mediocre Moto X camera and plane windows.

March 23, 2017
by jsproul
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Everything you need to know about Neil Gorsuch: freeze or get fired

Neil Gorsuch was the one judge—of seven involved in the case of Alphonse Maddin—who believed that a delivery company could fire a person for abandoning their vehicle rather than freeze to death.

“…Then the first thing I noticed was that in [Gorsuch’s] opening reference he simply called me a trucker and didn’t use my name,” Maddin said.

Read the article here. As I warned previously, Neil Gorsuch lives in a world of legal fantasy that is cerebral and lacks empathy, that treats people as objects rather than as people – i.e. a psychopath – and is incapable of executing the duties of his office to protect the fundamental rights of all citizens of the United States. He may pretend to be warm and folksy and kind. Psychopaths often do.

Why did he rule this way? Because the law wasn’t written to cover this precise set of conditions, regardless of legal intent or Department of Labor findings.

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January 29, 2016
by jsproul
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Being as a River

Ten years ago I overflowed
Full of lust, and wonder, and myself.
You rushed down with spring melt
And we were born
Seeing only far behind
Where we merged and wandered.

If every seven years our bodies
Are replaced completely,
I wonder whether waters
Know when they cease to be a stream
And have become the sea?

As droplets’ paths diverge
Do they remember
being a river

—Jason Y. Sproul copyright 2013-2016

December 16, 2015
by jsproul
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Carrion

Hark, you Judas within:
Dark earth folding beneath marching boots
Mud-sliding between the strangling roots
Cut short the slow hanging-man
From gallows of my corpse, still
Gasping for the cold dawn air.
Why could we not wait till noon?

—Jason Y. Sproul copyright 2014

April 26, 2015
by jsproul
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“Act with a determination not to be turned aside by thoughts of the past and fears of the future.”
—Robert E. Lee

MIT Mystery Hunt 2015

January 21, 2015 by jsproul | 0 comments

WoodPuzzle

A grand time was had by all at MIT Mystery Hunt 2015! The team I participated with, Left As An Exercise For The Reader, placed 17th out of 57 with over 120 solves including 1 of 3 meta-metas.

More importantly it was great fun. Some of the puzzles, like the 2D wood pieces above assembled entirely without the benefit of directions or glue were just spectacular. Some, like Nope! were just insanely frustrating.

I can’t wait for next year.

January 9, 2014
by jsproul
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New Yorker: The Open-Office Trap

…In 2011, the organizational psychologist Matthew Davis reviewed more than a hundred studies about office environments. He found that, though open offices often fostered a symbolic sense of organizational mission, making employees feel like part of a more laid-back, innovative enterprise, they were damaging to the workers’ attention spans, productivity, creative thinking, and satisfaction. Compared with standard offices, employees experienced more uncontrolled interactions, higher levels of stress, and lower levels of concentration and motivation. When David Craig surveyed some thirty-eight thousand workers, he found that interruptions by colleagues were detrimental to productivity, and that the more senior the employee, the worse she fared

via The New Yorker.